Chronological Bibliography of Early Occult Detectives

You can read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 of a discussion of how I settled on a definition of occult detective fiction. I also provide A Key to the Hyperlinks and My Occult Detective Types along with an annotated bibliography titled Critical Histories of Occult Detective Fiction.

1817

Doktor K. appeared in E.T.A. Hoffman’s short story “Das öde Haus,” a part of Nachtstücke. It was translated into English as “The Mystery of the Deserted House” for Hoffman’s Strange Stories (Boston: Burnham Brothers, 1855, pp. 428-44) and as “The Deserted House” for Library of the World’s Best Mystery and Detective Stories (New York: Review of Reviews, 1907, pp. 131-56). Doktor K investigates a supernatural mystery as a founding doctor-detective, though he has clairvoyant abilities.

1840

Dirk Ericson appeared in Henry William Herbert’s short story “The Haunted Homestead,” published in three parts in The Ladies’ Companion and Literary Expositor:  “The Murder” (13.8 [Aug., 1840] pp. 185-87), “The Mystery” (13.9 [Sept., 1840] pp. 227-30), and “The Revelation” (13.10 [Oct., 1840] pp. 265-68). The story was reprinted in The Night Season: Lost Tales from the Golden Age of Macabre (Rockville, MD: Wildside, 2012), which was also released as an ebook titled The Macabre Megapack: 25 Lost Tales from the Golden Age by the same publisher. Assisted by Asa and Enoch Allen, Ericson investigates a crime with supernatural elements as a founding novice-detective.

1855

Harry Escott appeared in Fitz-James O’Brien’s short story “The Pot of Tulips,” published in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine (11.66 [Nov., 1855] pp. 807-14). Four years later, Escott reappeared in O’Brien’s short story “What Was It? A Mystery,” published in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine (18.106 [Mar., 1859] pp. 504-10). Both stories are reprinted in Giving Up the Ghosts: Short-Lived Occult Detective Series by Six Renowned Authors (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip Press, 2015), edited by Tim Prasil. Assisted by Jasper Joye in the first story and by Dr. Hammond in the second, Escott investigates supernatural mysteries as a founding specialist-detective.

1859

An unnamed narrator appeared in Edward Bulwer-Lytton’s novella “The Haunted and the Haunters; or, The House and the Brain,” published in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (86.526 [Aug., 1859] pp. 224-45). It was republished in Bulwer-Lytton’s collection A Strange Story; and the Haunted and the Haunters (London: Routledge, Warne & Routledge, 1864, pp. 325-43), though Bulwer-Lytton edited it to make it seem less like “A Strange Story.” This abridged version often appears in subsequent anthologies, but the original version was republished about fifty years later (Chicago: Rajput, 1911). This character investigates a supernatural mystery as a founding specialist-detective.

1861

An unnamed narrator appeared in Bayard Taylor’s “The Haunted Shanty,” published in Atlantic Monthly (8.45 [July, 1861] pp. 57-72). It was reprinted in Taylor’s collection At Home and Abroad: A Sketch-book of Life, Scenery and Men (New York: Putnam, 1862, pp. 473-509, Second Series). This character investigates a supernatural mystery as a founding novice-detective with some characteristics of a doctor-detective.

1862

Ralph Henderson appeared in Charles Felix’s novel The Notting Hill Mystery, run in eight installments in Once a Week (7 [Nov. 29th, 1862] pp. 617-22; 7 [Dec. 6, 1862] pp. 645-50; 7 [Dec. 13, 1862] pp. 673-78; 7 [Dec. 20, 1862] pp. 701-07; 8 [Dec. 27, 1862] pp. 1-7; 8 [Jan. 3, 1863] pp. 29-35; 8 [Jan. 10, 1863] pp. 57-64; and 8 [Jan. 17, 1863] pp. 85-92.) The novel was then reprinted in one volume (London: Bradbury & Evans, 1863; London: Saunders, Otley, 1865; London: British Library, 2012). The work is often said to be the first mystery novel in the English language. Charles Felix was a pen name used by Charles Warren Adams. Henderson investigates a crime with supernatural elements as a founding novice-detective.

1866

Mr. Burton appeared in Seeley Regester’s magazine serial The Dead Letter, run in Beadle’s Monthly. The following year, the novel reappeared in one volume (New York: Beadle, 1867), and much later, it was reprinted with another mystery by Regester in The Dead Letter and the Figure Eight (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2003). This work is often said to be the first American mystery novel and the first mystery novel written by a woman. Seeley Regester was a pen name used by Metta Victoria Fuller Victor. Assisted by Richard Redfield, Burton investigates a crime as a founding clairvoyant-detective.

1869

Dr. Martin Hesselius appeared in Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s novella “Green Tea,” run in four installments in All the Year Round (citations refer to the journal’s second series: 2.47 [Oct. 23, 1869] pp. 501-04; 2.48 [Oct. 30, 1869] pp. 525-28;  2.49 [Nov. 6, 1869] pp. 548-22; and 2.50 [Nov. 13, 1869] pp. 572-76). Hesselius’s “immense collection of papers” then served as a framing device when “Green Tea” became the first story in Le Fanu’s collection In a Glass Darkly (London: R. Bentley & Son, 1872). The additional works, which do not spotlight Hesselius himself, are “The Familiar,” “Mr. Justice Harbottle,” “The Room in the Dragon Volant,” and “Carmilla.” The collection originally appeared in three volumes — available here, here, and here — and was later republished in one volume (London: Richard Bentley & Son, 1886). Multiple reprints are currently available. Hesselius investigates a supernatural mystery (and collects reports on others) as a founding doctor-detective.

1873

An unnamed narrator appeared in Maurice Davies’ short story “A Night in a Ghost-Chamber,” published in Belgravia 19 (First Series) [Jan., 1873] pp. 377-85. Assisted by Tom Chambers (and others), this character investigates a supernatural mystery as a novice-detective. (Though he admits to having a “weakness for the so-called ‘supernatural’,” his reactions in the title chamber reveal a lack of preparation.)

1874

An unnamed narrator appeared in the anonymous short story “A Needle in a Bottle,” published in Frank Leslie’s Pleasant Hours, Volume 15 (New York: Frank Leslie, 1874, pp. 294-301). This character investigates a supernatural mystery as a doctor-detective, one who is also familiar with cases involving “supernatural agency.”

1875

Henry Patterson appeared in Mrs. J. H. Riddell’s short novel The Uninhabited House,  published in Routledge’s Christmas Annual (London: George Routledge & Sons, 1875). It was then reprinted with another novel by Riddell in The Uninhabited House and The Haunted River (London: George Routledge & Sons, 1883, pp. 9-183; London: Chatto & Windus, 1885). More recently, E. F. Bleiler included it in the collection Five Victorian Ghost Novels (New York: Dover, 1971), and Richard Dalby included it in the collection The Haunted River & Three Other Ghostly Novellas (Mountain Ash, Wales: Sarob, 2001). Assisted by Dr. Ned Munro, Patterson investigates a supernatural mystery with criminal roots as a novice-detective.

1882

Theophilus “Phil” Edlyd appeared in Mrs. J. H. Riddell’s short story “The Open Door,” a part of her collection Weird Stories (London: J. Hogg, 1882, pp. 48-103; London: Chatto & Windus, 1884; London: Home and Van Thal, 1946; Brighton, England: Victorian Secrets, 2009). The story itself was also reprinted in The Oxford Book of Victorian Ghost Stories (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003). Edlyd investigates a supernatural mystery as a novice-detective.

1884

An unnamed narrator appeared in Angelo J. Lewis’s short story “My Only Ghost,” published in Mayfair Magazine (1.3 [Feb., 1884] pp. 289-300). This comical character investigates a supernatural mystery as a specialist-detective.

1888

An unnamed narrator appeared in B.L. Farjeon’s novel Devlin the Barber (London: Ward and Downey, 1888). Assisted by Devlin, this character investigates a crime with supernatural elements — namely, the clairvoyant Devlin — as a novice-detective.

1889

Constable Lumsden appeared in W.W.’s short story “The Phantom Hearse,” published in The Australian Journal (25.292 [Sept., 1889] pp. 45-52). The story was part of a newspaper series titled The Detective’s Album, which ran from 1867 to 1908. W. W. and Waif Wander were pen names used by Mary Fortune. With Mary Fortune named as author, the story was reprinted in the collection Three Murder Mysteries (Canberra, Australia: Mulini Press, 2009). Lumsden investigates a crime with supernatural elements as a novice-detective.

1890

Strickland appeared in Rudyard Kipling’s “The Mark of the Beast,” published in the Pioneer (July 12 & 14, 1890). He reappears in “The Return of Imray” (a.k.a. “The Recrudenscence of Imray”), found in Life’s Handicap: Being Stories of Mine Own People (London: McMillan, 1891, pp. 307-21.) Though those stories are set earlier in the character’s life, Strickland had appeared previously as a non-occult detective in “Miss Youghal’s Sais” (Civil and Military Gazette, [Apr. 25, 1887]) and “The Bronkhorst Divorce Case” (Plain Tales from the Hills [New York: Lovell, 1889] pp. 217-23. Assisted by the unnamed narrator, Stickland investigates first a supernatural mystery in “The Mark of the Beast” and then a criminal one with supernatural elements in “The Return of Imray” as a specialist-detective (in that he’s made a special study of the ways of the native Indian people who surround him).

1893

Ned Emery appeared in B.L. Farjeon’s novel The Last Tenant (New York: F.M. Lupton, 1893New York: Cassell, 1893). Assisted by Bob Millet, Emery investigates a supernatural mystery with criminal roots as a novice-detective.

1894

Dyson appeared in Arthur Machen’s novella “The Inmost Light,” a part of The Great God Pan and The Inmost Light (London: John Lane, 1894, pp. 111-68). It was reprinted in The House of Souls (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1922, pp. 245-86). Dyson reappeared in two short stories and a novel, all published in 1895. “The Shining Pyramid” was printed in The Unknown World (2.4 [May, 1895] pp. 148-55; and 2.5 [June, 1895] pp. 197-203), and “The Red Hand” was printed in Chapman’s Magazine of Fiction (2 [Christmas, 1895] pp. 390-418). The novel was The Three Imposters (London: John Lane, 1895; Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1985). “The Inmost Light,” “The Red Hand,” and The Three Imposters were reprinted in The House of Souls (London: Grant Richards, 1906). “The Shining Pyramid” was reprinted in The Shining Pyramid (Chicago: Covici-McGee, 1923, pp. 1-35; London: Martin Secker, 1925). All of the Dyson stories are in The Dyson Chronicles (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip, 2014). Dyson investigates supernatural mysteries as a specialist-detective.

1895

An unnamed narrator appeared in Ralph Adams Cram’s “Sister Maddelena,” a part of his collection Black Spirits and White: A Book of Ghost Stories (Chicago: Stone & Kimball, 1895, pp. 83-112). This story was then included in Masterpieces of Mystery: Ghost Stories (Vol. 2, Garden City: Doubleday, Page, 1922, pp. 167-90.) The complete collection was reprinted with James Platt’s Tales of the Supernatural in Shadows Gothic and Grotesque (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip, 2010). The same narrator is featured in the collection’s first four stories, but he only acts as a detective in “Sister Maddelena.” Accompanied more than assisted by Tom Rendel, this character investigates a supernatural mystery with criminal roots as a novice-detective.

1896

An unnamed narrator appeared in H.G. Wells’ short story “The Red Room,” published in The Idler (9.2 [March, 1896] pp. 290-95). It was reprinted in his collection The Plattner Story and Others (London: Methuen, 1897, pp. 165-78). This character investigates a supernatural mystery as a novice-detective.

Lord Syfret appeared in Arabella Kenealy’s series of short stories titled Some of Lord Syfret’s Experiences, run in Ludgate Magazine. Though I am unsure of the order or specific dates, the stories include “Stronheim’s Extremity,” “In a Terrible Grip,” “The Wolf and the Stork,” “The Villa of Simpkins,” “Prince Ranjichatterjee’s Vengeance,” “A Beautiful Vampire,” and “An Expiation.” One newspaper notice says that “In a Terrible Grip” was the second story when it appeared in the July issue of Ludgate, and another notice shows the series was still running in the September issue. While it is tempting to assume Ludgate released the stories on a monthly schedule, I have not found evidence to confirm this. The following year, all seven of Syfret’s stories reappeared in Kenealy’s collection Belinda’s Beaux and Other Stories (London: Bliss, Sands & Co., 1897) and, much later, in Supernatural Detectives 3: Flaxman Low/Lord Syfret (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip, 2011). Sufret investigates supernatural mysteries as a specialist-detective.

1897

Mr. Calder-Maxwell appeared in Lettice Galbraith‘s short story “The Blue Room,” published in McMillan’s (76 [Oct., 1897] pp. 467-80). It was reprinted in The Blue Room and Other Ghost Stories (Mountain Ash, Wales: Sarob, 1999) and in The Shadow on the Blind and Other Stories (Hertfordshire, England: Wordsworth, 2007). Calder-Maxwell investigates a supernatural mystery as a novice-detective.

Augustus Champnell appeared in Richard Marsh’s novel The Beetle (London: Skeffington, 1897; New York: G.P. Putnam, 1917). Multiple reprints are currently available. Champnell reappeared in the novel The House of Mystery (London: F. V. White, 1898), reprinted in Volume 4 of The Collected Supernatural and Weird Fiction of Richard Marsh (Driffield, England: Leonaur, 2012). Both of these novels have supernatural elements, but Champnell also appeared in five short stories that appear to be restricted to “earthly” crimes, though I’m still working to confirm this. “The Lost Letter,” “Lady Majendie’s Disappearance,” “The Burglary at Azalea Villa,” and “The Stolen Treaty” open his collection An Aristocratic Detective (London: Digby, Long, 1900). “The Robbery on the ‘Stormy Petrel'” is in his collection The Seen and the Unseen (London: Methuen, 1900, pp. 247-63). Champnell investigates crimes, some with supernatural elements, as a novice-detective.

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The Chief

The Chief appeared in Alexander M. Reynolds’  short story “The Mystery of Djara Singh: A Spiritual Detective Story,” published in Overland Monthly (30.179 [Nov., 1897] pp. 398-406). It was later anthologized in Master Detective Stories, edited by Arthur Neale (New York: E.J. Clode, 1929). The Chief investigates a crime with supernatural elements as a novice-detective.

Dr. Maxwell Dean appeared in Marie Corelli’s novel Ziska: The Problem of a Wicked Soul (Bristol: Arrowsmith, 1897; New York: Stone & Kimball, 1897; Richmond: Valancourt, 2009). Marie Corelli was the pen name of Mary Mackay. Dr. Dean investigates a supernatural mystery as a specialist-detective (but not a doctor-detective because he’s not a medical doctor).

Dr. Abraham Van Helsing appeared in Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula (London: Archibald Constable, 1897). Multiple reprints are currently available. Van Helsing investigates a supernatural mystery as a doctor-detective.

1898

Flaxman Low appeared in E. and H. Heron’s first series of short stories, run in the UK version of Pearson’s Magazine. The stories are “The Story of the Spainards, Hammersmith” (5.25 [Jan., 1898] pp. 60-69); “The Story of Medhans Lea” (5.26 [Feb., 1989] pp. 137-46); “The Story of the Moor Road” (5.27 [Mar., 1898] pp. 247-56); “The Story of Baelbrow” (5.28 [Apr., 1898] pp. 366-75); “The Story of the Grey House” (5.29 [May, 1898] pp. 473-82); and “The Story of Yand Manor House,” (5.30 [June, 1898] pp. 582-91).The following year, Low appeared in E. and H. Heron’s second series of short stories run in the UK version of Pearson’s Magazine. The stories are “The Story of Sevens Hall” (7.37 [Jan,, 1899] pp. 30-38); “The Story of Saddler’s Croft” (7.38 [Feb., 1899] pp. 176-85); “The Story of No. 1, Karma Crescent” (7.39 [Mar., 1899] pp. 259-67); “The Story of Konner Old House” (7.40 [Apr., 1899] pp. 430-39); “The Story of Crowsedge,” (7.41 [May, 1899] pp. 482-91); and “The Story of Mr. Flaxman Low,” (7.42 [June, 1899] pp. 578-87). All twelve of Low’s stories reappeared in E. and H. Heron’s collection Ghosts: Being the Experiences of Flaxman Low (London: C.A. Pearson, 1899). Multiple reprints are currently available. E. and H. Heron were the pen names used by Kate Pritchard and her son, Hesketh. Low investigates supernatural mysteries as a specialist-detective.

1899

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Dr. Hardarce

Enoch F. Gerrish appeared in Gelett Burgess’ short story “The Spectre House,” printed in Black & White (Christmas, 1899). It was reprinted in Harper’s Bazaar (33.1 [Jan. 6, 1900] p. 24) and The Evening Post (61.16 [Jan. 19, 1901] p. 1 of supplement). Gerrish reappeared in the short story “The Levitant,” a part of Burgess’ collection The Burgess Nonsense Book (New York: Frederick Stokes, 1901, pp. 113-24), which includes “The Spectre House” (pp. 125-31). Gerrish next appeared in the short story “The Ghost-Extinguisher,” published in Cosmopolitan (38.6 [Apr., 1905] pp. 689-96) and reprinted in Humorous Ghost Stories (New York: G.P. Putnam’s, 1921, pp. 51-66). All three stories are reprinted in Giving Up the Ghosts: Short-Lived Occult Detective Series by Six Renowned Authors (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip Press, 2015), edited by Tim Prasil. Gerrish investigates supernatural mysteries as a comical specialist-detective.

Dr. Hardarce appeared in Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story “The Brown Hand,” published in The Strand (17.101 [May, 1899] pp. 499-508).  It was reprinted in Doyle’s collection Round the Fire (New York: McClure, 1908, pp. 287-307). Hardacre investigates a supernatural mystery as a doctor-detective.

Stokeman appeared in Thomas Nelson Page’s short story “The Spectre in the Cart,” published in Scribner’s (26.2 [Aug., 1899] pp. 179-89).  It was reprinted in Page’s collection Bred in the Bone (New York: Scribner’s, 1904, pp. 63-102). Stokeman investigates a crime with supernatural elements as a novice-detective.

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1900

“Terrapin” Rodgers appeared in Willa Cather’s short story “The Affair at Grover Station,” published in The Library (1 [June 16, 1900] 3-4). It was reprinted in Cather’s Early Stories (New York: Dodd, Mead, 1957, pp. 239-56) and in Willa Cather’s Collected Short Fiction, 1892-1912 (Revised edition, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1970, pp. 339-52). Rodgers investigates a crime with supernatural elements as a novice-detective.

Jim Shorthouse
Jim Shorthouse

Jim Shorthouse appeared in Algernon Blackwood’s short story “A Case of Eavesdropping,” published in Pall Mall Magazine (22.92 [Dec., 1900] pp. 558-68). It and three more Shorthouse stories are part of Blackwood’s collection The Empty House and Other Stories  (London: Eveleigh Nash, 1906). The additional stories are “The Empty House,” “With Intent to Steal,” and “The Strange Adventures of a New York Secretary.” In terms of Shorthouse’s character development, the stories seem as if they should proceed in this order: “A Case of Eavesdropping,” “The Strange Adventures of a New York Secretary,” “The Empty House,” and “With Intent to Steal.” The four stories are reprinted this way in Giving Up the Ghosts: Short-Lived Occult Detective Series by Six Renowned Authors (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip Press, 2015), edited by Tim Prasil. With this sequence in mind, Shorthouse investigates supernatural mysteries, growing from a novice-detective into a specialist-detective.

1902

Lionel Dacre appeared in Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story “The Leather Funnel,” published in McClure’s Magazine (20.1 [Nov., 1902] pp. 17-25) and then in The Strand Magazine (25.150 [June, 1903] pp. 648-55). It was reprinted in Doyle’s short story collection Round the Fire Stories (New York: McClure, 1908, pp. 3-19) and then in another of Doyle’s short story collections, The Black Doctor and Other Tales of Terror and Mystery (New York: George H. Doran, 1919, pp. 31-46; London: John Murray, 1922). With an unnamed, clairvoyant narrator as assistant, Dacre investigates a supernatural mystery — namely, dream psychometry — as a clairvoyant-detective.

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Diana Marburg

Diana Marburg appeared in L.T. Meade and Robert Eustace’s series of short stories, run in the US version of Pearson’s Magazine. The stories are “The Dead Hand” (13.74 [Feb., 1902] pp. 177-86); “Finger Tips” (14.80 [Aug., 1902] pp. 787-97); and “Sir Penn Caryll’s Engagement” (14.84 [Dec., 1902] pp. 1269-77). These are part of Meade’s collection titled The Oracle of Maddox Street (London: Ward, Lock, 1904). The three stories are reprinted in Giving Up the Ghosts: Short-Lived Occult Detective Series by Six Renowned Authors (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip Press, 2015), edited by Tim Prasil. First identifying likely criminals via palm-reading, Marburg investigates crimes as a unique type of clairvoyant-detective.

1904

Andrew Latter appeared in Harold Begbie’s series of short stories, run in London Magazine. The six stories are “The Murder in an Omnibus” (June, 1904); “The Affair of the Duke of Nottingham” (July, 1904); “The Eye at the Drawn Blind” (Aug., 1904); “The Charge Against Lord William Grace” (Sept., 1904); “The Missing Heir” (Oct., 1904); and “The Flying Blindness” (Nov., 1904). The series was reprinted in The Amazing Dreams of Andrew Latter (Ashcroft, BC: Ash-Tree Press, 2002).  Latter investigates crimes as a clairvoyant-detective.

1905

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Jack Hargreaves

Jack Hargreaves appeared in Allen Upward’s series of short stories, run in The Royal Magazine. The five stories are “The Story of the Green House, Wallington” (15.86 [Dec., 1905] pp. 146-51); “The Tapping on the Wainscotting” (15.87 [Jan., 1906] pp. 264-70); “The Secret of Horner’s Court” (15.88 [Feb., 1906] pp. 361-67); “The Two Roses” (15.89 [Mar., 1906] pp. 424-30); and “The Haunted Woman” (15.90 [Apr., 1906] pp. 543-50). Assisted by Alwyne Sargent, a clairvoyant, Hargreaves investigates supernatural mysteries as a specialist-detective.

1906

Westrel Keen appeared in Robert W. Chamber’s The Tracer of Lost Persons series. Two of the stories involve the supernatural: “Solomon’s Seal” (Saturday Evening Post 178.40 [Mar. 31, 1906] pp. 13-3, 16-19; The Idler 30.49 [Oct., 1906] pp. 3-19) and “Samaris” (Saturday Evening Post 178.45 [May 5, 1906] pp. 3-5, 24-31; The Idler 30.52 [Jan., 1907] pp. 435-50). The stories are collected in The Tracer of Lost Persons (New York: D. Appleton, 1906). Keen investigates a supernatural mystery in the first story — and a crime with supernatural elements in the second — as a specialist-detective.

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Westrel Keen

1907

An unnamed narrator appeared in Algernon Blackwood’s short story “The Woman’s Ghost Story,” a part of his collection The Listener and Other Stories (London: Eveleigh Nash, 1907, pp. 337-50; New York: Alfred Knopf, 1917, pp. 337-50). It was reprinted in The Best Ghost Stories (New York: Modern Library, 1919, pp. 108-17) and in the UK version of Pearson’s Magazine (48.318 [June, 1922] pp. 32-35). This character investigates a supernatural mystery as a specialist-detective.

1908

John Silence appeared in Algernon Blackwood’s collection John Silence, Physician Extraordinary (London: Eveleigh Nash, 1908; Boston: John W. Luce, 1909). The stories are “Case I: A Psychical Invasion,” “Case II: Ancient Sorceries,” “Case III: The Nemesis of Fire, “Case IV: Secret Worship,” and “Case V: The Camp of the Dog.” Another John Silence story titled “A Victim of Higher Space” was printed in Occult Review (Dec., 1914) and then in Day and Night Stories (London: Cassell, 1917; New York: Dutton, 1917, pp. 192-215). Multiple reprints are currently available. Assisted by Hubbard in some of the stories and by Barker in the last, Silence investigates supernatural mysteries as both a doctor-detective and a clairvoyant-detective.

1909

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“Mr. Perseus”

“Mr. Perseus” appeared Rudyard Kipling’s short story “The House Surgeon,” published in Harper’s Magazine in two parts (119.712 [Sept., 1909] pp. 489-97; and 119.713 [Oct., 1909] pp. 720-26). It was reprinted in Kipling’s collection Actions and Reactions (New York: Doubleday, 1909, pp. 283-322). “Mr. Perseus” investigates a supernatural mystery as a novice-detective.

1910

An unnamed narrator appeared in C. Ashton Smith’s short story “The Ghost of Mohammed Din,” published in Overland Monthly (56.5 [Nov., 1910] pp. 519-22). It was reprinted in Other Dimensions (Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1970). This character investigates a supernatural mystery with criminal roots as a novice-detective.

Dr. Ivan Brodsky appeared in H.M. Egbert’s series of twelve short stories, published in various newspapers. Eleven of these were reprinted in Weird Tales. The original sequence of the stories varied between newspapers, but Weird Tales arranged them in this order: “The Case of the Jailer’s Daughter” (Tensas Gazette, Oct. 14, 1910, p. 10 and Weird Tales 8.3 [Sep., 1926]); “The Woman with the Crooked Nose” (Goshen Daily Democrat, Oct. 7, 1910, p. 6 and Weird Tales 8.4 [Oct., 1926]; “The Tenth Commandment” (St. Tammany Farmer, Nov. 19, 1910, p. 5 and Weird Tales 8.5 [Nov., 1926]; “The Legacy of Hate” (Tensas Gazette, Oct. 28, 1910, p. 3 and Weird Tales 8.6 [Dec., 1926]); “The Major’s Menagerie” (Tensas Gazette, Dec. 9, 1910, p. 6 and Weird Tales 9.1 [Jan., 1927]); “The Fetish of the Waxworks” (Tensas Gazette, Dec. 23, 1910, pg. 3 and Weird Tales 9.2 [Feb., 1927]); “The Seventh Symphony (Tensas Gazette, Jan. 6, 1911, pg. 8) and Weird Tales 9.3 [Mar., 1927]); “The Chairs of Stuyvensant Baron” (Tensas Gazette, Feb. 3, 1911, pg. 3 and Weird Tales 9.4 [Apr., 1927]); “The Man Who Lost His Luck” (St. Tammany Farmer, Jan. 14, 1911, pg. 5 and Weird Tales 9.5 [May, 1927]; “The Dream that Came True” (Tensas Gazette, Mar. 3, 1911, pg. 3 and Weird Tales 9.6 [June, 1927]); and “The Ultimate Problem” (Tensas Gazette, Mar. 17, 1911, pg. 6 and Weird Tales 10.1 [July, 1927]). The one story that was not reprinted in Weird Tales was “Homo Homunculus” (Tensas Gazette, Feb. 17, 1911, pg. 3). H.M. Egbert is the pen name of Victor Rousseau Emanuel. All twelve stories were collected in The Surgeon of Souls (Altamonte Springs, FL: Spectre Library, 2006).  Assisted by the unnamed narrator, a fellow doctor, Brodsky investigates supernatural mysteries as a doctor-detective.

Thomas Carnacki appeared in William Hope Hodgson’s series of short stories, published in various magazines. The first stories are “The Gateway of the Monster” (The Idler, Jan, 1910); “The House among the Laurels (The Idler, Feb., 1910); “The Whistling Room” (The Idler, Mar., 1910); “The Horse of the Invisible” (The Idler, Apr., 1910);  “The Searcher of the End House (The Idler, June 1910); and “The Thing Invisible” (The New Magazine, Jan., 1912). These six stories reappeared in Carnacki, the Ghost Finder (London: Eveleigh Nash, 1913). Hodgson, who died in 1918, had written three more Carnacki stories that were published posthumously. These stories are “The Haunted Jarvee” (The Premier, Mar., 1929); “The Hog” (Weird Tales, Jan., 1947); and “The Find.” All nine of the stories reappear in Carnacki, the Ghost Finder (Sauk City, WS: Mycroft & Moran, 1947). Multiple reprints are currently available. Carnaki investigates supernatural mysteries as a specialist-detective.

1911

Dr. Xavier Wycherley appeared in Max Rittenberg’s series of eighteen short stories, published variously in London Magazine, Blue Book, and New Magazine. Fourteen of the stories were reprinted, broken into chapters and given new title combinations, in The Mind-Reader: Being Some Pages from the Strange Life of Dr. Xavier Wycherley (New York: D. Appleton, 1913; Toronto: Bell & Cockburn, 1913) and later in 2 Detectives: Astro, the Master of Mysteries/Dr. Xavier Wycherley, the Mind-Reader (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip, 2011). Wycherley investigates crimes as both a doctor-detective and a clairvoyant-detective.

1912

Semi Dual
Semi Dual

Semi Dual appeared in J.U. Giesy and Junius B. Smith’s novella “The Occult Detector,” serialized in Cavalier (Feb. 17, 24, Mar. 2, 1912). He reappeared in a long series of works published in Cavalier, starting with “The Significance of the High ‘D'” (Mar. 9, 16, 23. 1912), “The Wisteria Scarf” (June 1, 8, 15. 1912), “The Purple Light” (Oct. 5,12, 19, 1912), “The Master Mind” (Jan. 25, 1913), “Rubies of Doom,” (July 5, 12, 1913), “The House of the Ego” (Sep. 20, 27, Oct. 4, 1913), and “The Ghost of a Name” (Dec. 20, 1913). The series then moved to All-Story Magazine for four years, starting with “The Curse of Quetzal,” (Nov. 28, 1914), “The Web of Destiny” (Mar. 20, 27, 1915), “Snared” (Dec. 11. 18, 25, 1915), “Box 991” (June 3, 10, 17, 1916), and “The Killer” (Apr. 7, 14, 21, 28, 1917). The stories then appeared in various magazines: “The Storehouse of Past Events” (People’s Favorite, Feb. 10, 1918), “The Moving Shadow (People’s Favorite, June 10, 1918), “The Stars Were Looking” (Top-Notch, July 1, 1918), “The Black Butterfly” (All-Story, Sep. 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 1918), and “The Trail in the Dust” (People’s Favorite, Oct. 25, 1918). The series completed its run All-Story, which was renamed Argosy All-Story in 1920 and shortened to Argosy around 1930. These works are “Stars of Evil” (Jan. 25, Feb. 1, 8, 1919), “The Ivory Pipe” (Sep. 20, 27, Oct. 4, 1919), “House of the Hundred Lights” (May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 1920), “Black and White” (Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 1920), “Wolf of Erlik” (Oct. 22, 19, Nov. 5, 12, 1921), “Poor Little Pigeon” (Aug. 9, 16, 23, 30, Sep. 6. 13, 1924), “The House of Invisible Bondage” (Sep. 18, 25, Oct. 2, 9, 1926), “The Woolly Dog” (Mar. 23, 20, Apr. 6, 13, 1929), “The Green Goddess” (Jan. 31, Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, Mar. 7, 1931), and “The Ledger of Life” (June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 1934). A proposed reprinting of the entire series has begun with The Complete Cabalistic Cases of Semi Dual, the Occult Detector, Volume 1: 1912 (Boston: Altus Press, 2013). Assisted by Gordon Glace, Semi Dual investigates crimes, some with supernatural elements, as a clairvoyant-detective.

1913

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Moris Klaw

Moris Klaw appeared in Sax Rohmer’s series of short stories, run in The New Magazine. The stories probably ran as follows: “The Tragedies in the Greek Room” (Apr., 1913); “The Potsherd of Anibis” (May, 1913); “The Crusader’s Ax” (June, 1913); “The Ivory Statue” (July, 1913); “The Blue Rajah” (Aug., 1913); “The Whispering Poplars” (Sept., 1913); “The Chord in G” (Oct., 1913); “The Headless Mummies” (Nov., 1913); “The Haunting of Grange” (Dec., 1913); and “The Case of the Veil of Isis” (Jan., 1914). The series was reprinted in the collection The Dream Detective (London: Jarrods, 1920) without “The Chord in G.” This story was reinserted into U.S. version of The Dream Detective (New York: Doubleday, Page, 1925). All of the stories were reprinted in Supernatural Detectives 2: Aylmer Vance/Morris Klaw (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip, 2011). Sax Rohmer was a pen name used by Arthur Henry Sarsfield Ward. Assisted by Mr. Searles and by Isis, Klaw’s daughter, Klaw investigates criminal and supernatural mysteries as a clairvoyant-detective.

1914

Aylmer Vance appeared in Claude and Alice Askew’s series of short stories, run in The Weekly Tale-Teller. The stories are “The Invader” (July 4, 1914); “The Stranger” (July 11, 1914); “Lady Greenselves” (July 18, 1914); “The Unquenchable Fire” (July 25, 1914); “The Vampire” (Aug. 1, 1914); “The Boy of Blackstock” (Aug. 8, 1914); “The Insoluble Bond” (Aug. 15, 1914); and “The Fear” (Aug. 22, 1914). All of the stories were reprinted in Aylmer Vance: Ghost-seer (Ashcroft, BC: Ash-Tree Press, 1998; Hertfordshire, England: Wordsworth, 2006) and in Supernatural Detectives 2: Aylmer Vance/Morris Klaw (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip, 2011). Assisted by Dexter, who is clairvoyant, Vance investigates supernatural mysteries as a specialist-detective.

1915

Lester Stukeley appeared in Jessie Douglas Kerruish’s short story “The Swaying Vision,” printed in The Weekly Tale-Teller (Jan. 16, 1915). The story was reprinted in The Ash-Tree Press Annual Macabre 1997 (Ashcroft, BC: Ash-Tree Press, 1997). Stukeley investigates a supernatural mystery as a specialist-detective.

1916

Dr. Payson Alden appeared in Eustace Hall Ball’s novelization of the film serial The Mysteries of Myra, run in The Washington Times and other Hearst newspapers. Coinciding with the original releases of each episode of the movie serial, the novelization appeared as follows: Chapters 1-8 (Apr. 23, pp. 10-11), Chapters 9-12 (Apr. 30, pp. 12, 16), Chapters 13-16 (May 7, pp. 14, 16), Chapters 17-21 (May 14, pp. 14-15), Chapters 22-25 (May 21, p. 15), Chapters 29-32 (May 28, p. 11), Chapters 33-36 (June 4, p. 14), Chapters 37-41 (June 11, pp. 12, 18), Chapters 43-46 (June 18, p. 18), Chapters 46-48 (June 25, p. 10), Chapters 49-51 (July 2, p. 14), Chapters 52-54 (July 9, p. 7), Chapters 55-58 (July 16, p. 12), Chapters 59-61 (July 23, p. 12), and Chapters 62-65 (July 30, p. 14). (The mistakes in the chapter sequence match the newspaper publication.) As with the newspaper serial, Hereward Carrington was given authorial credit when the novelization was reprinted as a book (Rangoon: British Burma Press, 1917). There is also a more recent reprint with photos from and information about the film version (Newtown, PA: Serial Squadron, 2010). Alden has been called film’s first occult detective. Assisted by Professor Haji, Alden is a doctor-detective.

Dr. James Lewis appeared in Arthur Machen’s novel The Great Terror, serialized in the London Evening News (Oct. 16-31, 1916). It was then published as The Terror: A Fantasy (London: Duckworth, 1917) and as The Terror: A Mystery (New York: Robert M. McBride, 1917). An abridged version was published as “The Coming of the Terror” in Century Magazine (94.6 [Oct., 1917] pp. 801-25). Lewis investigates a supernatural mystery as a doctor-detective.

1917

Dr. John Durston appeared in William Le Queux’s collection The Rainbow Mystery: Chronicles of a Colour-Criminologist Recorded by His Secretary (London: Hodder and Stoughton, Limited, 1917). The stories were reprinted in Supernatural Detectives 5: The Colour-Criminologist/From Whose Bourne (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip, 2012). Durston investigates crimes as both a doctor-detective and a clairvoyant-detective.

Simon Iff appeared in Edward Kelly’s series of short stories titled The Scrutinies of Simon Iff, run in The International. The stories are “Big Game” (Sept., 1917); “The Artistic Temperament” (Oct., 1917); “Outside the Bank’s Routine” (Nov., 1917); “The Conduct of John Briggs” (Dec., 1917); “Not Good Enough” (Jan., 1918); and “Ineligible” (Feb., 1918). Edward Kelly was a pen name of Aleister Crowley, a name he dropped when Iff next appeared in the novel Moonchild (London: Mandrake, 1929). Iff reappears in three collections that were published posthumously: Simon Iff in America (twelve stories), Simon Iff Abroad (three stories extant), and Simon Iff, Psychoanalyst (two stories extant). The stories were reprinted in Simon Iff Stories and Other Works (Hertfordshire, England: Wordsworth, 2012) and can be read online here. Iff investigates crimes as a specialist-detective.

Dr. Arnold Rhymer appeared in Uel Key’s series of short stories, run in the UK version of Pearson’s Magazine. Five of the stories were reprinted in The Broken Fang and Other Experiences of a Specialist in Spooks (London: Hodder & Stouchton, 1920). Those stories are “The Broken Fang,” “The Shrouded Dome,” “A Post-Mortem Reversal,” “A Prehistoric Vendetta,” and “A Spring of Sweet Briar.” Rhymer then appeared in a novel titled Yellow Death: A Tale of Occult Mysteries, Recording a Further Experience of Professor Rhymer the ‘Spook’ Specialist (London: Books Limited, 1921). At least two more Rhymer short stories were then printed in the UK version of Pearson’s: “The Inaudible Sound” (51.301 [Jan., 1921] pp.7-15) and “Buried Needles” (53.314 [Feb. 1922] pp. 143-51). Rhymer investigates supernatural mysteries as a doctor-detective.

1918

Solange Fontaine appeared in F. Tennyson Jesse’s series of short stories, run in Premier Magazine. I am still researching the original publication dates, but the first set of stories appear to be “Mademoiselle Lamotte of the Mantles,” “The Lovers of St. Lys,” “Emma-Brother and Susie-Brother,” “The Green Parrakeet,” “The Mother’s Heart,” “What Happened at Bout-du-Monde,” “The Sanatorium,” and “The Railway Carriage.” “Mademoiselle Lamotte of the Mantles” was also published in Metropolitan (Aug. 1918). “The Lovers of St. Lys” was also published in Metropolitan (Aug. 1919) and then reprinted in Ms. Murder:  The Best Mysteries Featuring Women Detectives, by the Top Women Writers (Secaucus, NJ: Citadel, 1989). All six stories were reprinted in The Adventures of Solange Fontaine (London: Thomas Carnacki, 1995). Jesse next wrote another set of Fontaine stories: “The Black Veil,” “The Pedlar,” “The Reprieve,” “The Canary,” and “Lot’s Wife.” “The Black Veil” and “The Pedlar” both appeared in The London Magazine (respectively, Sept., 1929, and Dec., 1929). All five later works were reprinted in The Solange Stories (London: Heinemann, 1931; New York: Macmillian, 1931.) Fontaine investigates crimes as a clairvoyant-detective.

Godfrey Usher appeared in Herman Landon’s series of short stories, run in Detective Story Magazine. The stories are “Twin Shadows” (Feb. 5, 1918), “A Post-Mortem Appointment” (Feb. 12, 1918) “Soundless Melodies” (Feb. 26, 1918), “Whispers from the Dead” (Mar. 5, 1918), “The Purple Terror” (July 16, 1918), “Told in Shadow” (July 23, 1918), and “Three Wishes” (July 30, 1918). Assisted by Inspector Sebastian, Usher investigates criminal and supernatural mysteries as a clairvoyant-detective.

1919

Lincoln Osgood appeared in Gerald Biss’s novel The Door of the Unreal (London: Eveleigh Nash, 1919; New York: G.P. Putnam, 1920.) Assisted by Fitzroy Manders, Osgood investigates a supernatural mystery as a specialist detective.

Norton Vyse appeared in Rose Champion De Crespigny’s series of short stories, run in Premier Magazine. The stories are “The Moving Finger” (Sept. 26, 1919); “The Shears of Atropos” (Oct. 10, 1919); “The Villa on the Bordereve Road” (Oct. 24, 1919); “The Witness in the Wood” (Nov. 7, 1919); “The Case of Mr. Fitzgordon” (Nov. 21, 1919); and “The Voice” (Dec. 5, 1919). The stories were reprinted in Norton Vyse, Psychic (Ashcroft, BC: Ash-Tree Press, 1999). Vyse investigates supernatural mysteries as a clairvoyant-detective.

1920

Shiela Crerar appeared in Ella M. Scrymour’s series of short stories, run in The Blue Magazine. The stories are “The Eyes of Doom” (May, 1920); “The Death Vapour”(June, 1920); “The Room of Fear” (July, 1920); “The Phantom Isle” (Aug., 1920); “The Werewolf of Rannoch” (Sept., 1920); and “The Wraith of Fergus McGinty” (Oct., 1920). The stories were reprinted in Shiela Crerar, Psychic Investigator (Ashcroft, BC: Ash-Tree Press, 2006) and in Supernatural Detectives 4: Shiela Crerar/Luna Bartendale & The Undying Monster (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip, 2012). They are also online here.  Crerar investigates supernatural mysteries as a clairvoyant-detective.

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Derek Scarpe

Dr. Philip Fosdick appeared in Louis Joseph Vance’s novel The Dark Mirror (New York: Doubleday, Page, 1920). Fosdick investigates a supernatural mystery with criminal roots as a doctor-detective.

Derek Scarpe appeared in two of A.M. Burrage’s short stories, run in Novel Magazine . The stories are “The Severed Head” (31.183 [June, 1920] pp. 61-66) and “The House of Treburyan” (31.184 [July, 1920] pp. 371-76). Both stories are reprinted in Giving Up the Ghosts: Short-Lived Occult Detective Series by Six Renowned Authors (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip Press, 2015), edited by Tim Prasil. Scarpe investigates supernatural mysteries as a specialist-detective.

1921

John Barron appeared in W.J. Wintle’s short story “The Voice in the Night,” a part of his collection Ghost Gleams: Tales of the Uncanny (London: Heath Cranton, 1921; Ashcroft, BC: Ash-Tree, 1999). Barron investigates a supernatural mystery as a novice-detective.

1922

Luna Bartendale appeared in Jessie Douglas Kerruish’s novel The Undying Monster:  A Tale of the Fifth Dimension (London: Heath Cranton, 1922; New York: Macmillan, 1936). It was republished in Supernatural Detectives 4: Shiela Crerar/Luna Bartendale & The Undying Monster (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip, 2012). Bartendale investigates a supernatural mystery as a clairvoyant-detective.

Dan Dorety appeared in William Hamilton Osbourne’s short story “Hearsay Evidence,” published in Munsey’s (75.2 [Mar., 1922] pp. 223-35). Dorety investigates a criminal mystery as a clairvoyant-detective, though he is not the clairvoyant himself.

Dr. John Richard Taverner appeared in Dion Fortune’s series of six short stories, run in Royal Magazine. Eleven stories were then printed in the collection The Secrets of Dr. Taverner (London: Noel Douglas, 1926). However, there are twelve Dr. Taverner stories in all. They are “Blood Lust,” “The Return of the Ritual,” “The Man Who Sought,” “The Soul That Would Not Be Born,” “The Scented Poppies,” “The Death Hound,” “A Daughter of Pan,” “The Subletting of the Mansion,” “Recalled,” “The Sea Lure,” “The Power House,” and “Son of the Night.” Multiple reprints of the complete collection are available, and the stories are online here. Dion Fortune was the pen name of Violet Mary Firth. Assisted by Dr. Rhodes, Taverner investigates supernatural mysteries as a doctor-detective.

Damon Vane appeared in Elliot O’Donnell’s series of short stories, which began in Novel Magazine. The first story is titled “The Seventh Stair” (May, 1922). Specifics on this story and the rest are difficult to find, and I am still investigating this character.

1925

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Jules de Grandin

Jules de Grandin appeared in Seabury Quinn’s long-running series of short stories, novellas, and one novel printed in Weird Tales. The series begins with “The Horror on the Links” (6.4 [Oct., 1925]) and ends with “The Ring of Bastet” (43.6  [Sept., 1951]). Ten of the stories were reprinted in the collection The Phantom Fighter: 10 Memoirs of Jules Grandin, Sometime Member of La Surete General, la Faculte de Medicine Legal de Paris, etc., etc. (Sauk City, WI: Mycroft and Moran, 1966). Many of the stories — along with The Devil’s Bride, Quinn’s novel featuring de Grandin — were reprinted in The Adventures of Jules de Grandin (New York: Popular Library, 1976); The Casebook of Jules de Grandin (New York: Popular Library, 1976); The Skeleton Closet of Jules de Grandin (New York: Popular Library, 1976); The Devil’s Bride (New York: Popular Library, 1976); The Hellfire Files of Jules de Grandin (New York: Popular Library, 1976); and The Horror Chambers of Jules de Grandin (New York: Popular Library, 1977). The entire collection of de Grandin stories was published in a three volume set titled The Compleat Adventures of Jules de Grandin  (Shelburne, ON: Battered Silicon Disbatch Box, 2001). Another multi-volume set of the complete stories is being released with The Horror on the Links: The Complete Tales of Jules De Grandin, Volume One and The Devil’s Rosary: The Complete Tales of Jules De Grandin, Volume Two (San Francisco: Night Shade, 2017) already available. Assisted by Dr. Trowbridge, de Grandin investigates supernatural mysteries as a doctor-detective.

1926

Pierre d’Artois appeared in E. Hoffman Price’s series of short stories and novellas, including “The World of Santiago” (Weird Tales 7.2 [Feb., 1926]), “The Peacock’s Shadow” (Weird Tales 8.5 [Nov., 1926]), “The Bride of the Peacock” (Weird Tales 20.2 [Aug., 1932]), “Return of Balkis” (Weird Tales 21.4 [Apr., 1933]), “Lord of the Fourth Axis” (Weird Tales 22.5 [Nov., 1933], “One Arabian Night” (Spicy-Adventure Stories 1.2 [Feb., 1934]), “Satan’s Garden” (Weird Tales 23.4 and 23.5 [May and Apr., 1936]), and “Queen of the Linen” [Weird Tales 24.5 [Nov., 1936]). I’m still investigating this character, but d’Artois appears to investigate supernatural mysteries as a specialist detective.

1927

Francis Chard appeared in A.M. Burrage’s s series of short stories, published in The Blue Magazine. The stories are “The Affair at Penbillo” (Feb., 1927); “The Pit in the Garden” (Mar., 1927); “The Woman with Three Eyes” (Apr., 1927); “The Third Visitation” (May, 1927); “The Girl in Blue” (June 1927); “The Bungalow at Shammerton” (July, 1927); “The Protector” (Aug., 1927); “The Soldier” (Sept., 1927); “The Hiding Hole” (Oct., 1927); and “The Tryst” (Nov. 1927). The series was reprinted in The Occult Files of Francis Chard: Some Ghost Stories (Ashcroft, BC: Ash-Tree Press, 1996), which includes Burrage’s other occult detective, Derek Scarpe (see 1920). Chard appears to investigate supernatural mysteries as a specialist-detective, but I haven’t confirmed this.

Thomas F. Malone appeared in H.P. Lovecraft’s novella “The Horror at Red Hook,” printed in Weird Tales (9.1 [Jan., 1927] pp. 59-73). It has been frequently reprinted. Malone investigates a supernatural mystery as a novice detective.

1928

An unnamed narrator appeared in H.P. Lovecraft’s novella “The Shunned House” (Athol, MA: The Recluse Press, 1928). It was reprinted in Weird Tales (30.4 [Oct., 1937] pp. 418-36). Assisted by his uncle, Elihu Whipple, the character investigates a supernatural mystery as a novice detective.

Charles Carrington appeared in Henry C. Mercer’s “The Doll’s Castle,” one of the stories in his collection November Night Tales: A Book of Short Stories (New York: Walter Neale, 1928, pp. 151-85. Assisted by George Westbrook, the character investigates a supernatural mystery as a novice detective.

Inspector John Raymond Legrasse appeared in H.P. Lovecraft’s novella “The Call of Cthulhu,” printed in Weird Tales (11.2 [Feb., 1928] pp. 159-78, 287). Legrasse investigates a criminal mystery with supernatural elements as a novice detective.

1929

Gerald Canevin appeared in Henry S. Whitehead’s “Black Tancrède,” printed in Weird Tales (13.6 [June, 1929]). He had debuted in Weird Tales earlier, but only as a chronicler of other characters’ occult experiences. Those stories are “The Projection of Armand Dubois” (8.4 [Oct., 1926]) and “The People of Pan” (13.3 [Mar., 1929]). Canevin then appeared in various roles — reporter, assistant, full-fledged detective, victim — in “The Shut Room” (Weird Tales 15.4 [Apr., 1930]); “The Black Terror” (Weird Tales 18.3 [Oct., 1931]; “The Black Beast” (Adventure 79.3 [July 15, 1931]); “Passing of a God” (Weird Tales 17.1 [Jan., 1931]); “The Tree-Man” (Weird Tales 17.2 [Feb.-Mar., 1931]); “Cassius” (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror 1.2 [Nov., 1931]); “The Trap,” co-written with H.P. Lovecraft (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror, [Mar., 1932]); “Mrs. Lorriquer” (Weird Tales 19.4 [Apr., 1932]); “The Great Circle” (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror [June, 1932]); “The Napier Limousine” (Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror [Jan., 1933]); “The Chadbourne Episode” (Weird Tales 21.2 [Feb., 1933]); and “‘Williamson,'” which was published posthumously in West India Lights (Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1946). All of the stories are reprinted in Voodoo Tales: The Ghost Stories of Henry S. Whitehead (Hertfordshire, England: Wordsworth, 2012). Canevin assists Lord Carruth (see 1930) in criminal cases involving the occult in “The Shut Room” and “The Napier Limousine.” He is probably the most like an independent occult detective in “Black Tancrède,” “The Black Beast,” “Mrs. Lorriquer,” and “The Chadbourne Episode,” wherein he investigates supernatural mysteries as a specialist detective.

1930

Lord Carruth appeared in Henry S. Whitehead’s “The Shut Room,” printed in Weird Tales (15.4 [Apr., 1930]). He reappeared in “The Napier Limousine” in Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror (Jan., 1933). Both stories are reprinted in Voodoo Tales: The Ghost Stories of Henry S. Whitehead (Hertfordshire, England: Wordsworth, 2012). Assisted by Gerald Canevin (see 1929), Lord Carruth investigates criminal mysteries with supernatural elements as a specialist detective.

Dr. James Livingstone appeared in L. Adams Beck’s collection of short stories Openers of the Gate: Stories of the Occult (NY: Cosmopolitan, 1930). Livingstone investigates supernatural mysteries as a doctor-detective.

Sebastian Quin appeared in Sydney Horler’s short story “Black Magic,” collected in The Screaming Skull and Other Stories (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1930). The character had appeared earlier in a non-occult mystery titled “The Clean Wineglass” in Detective Magazine (5.60 [Feb. 27, 1925]), later collected in The House in Greek Street, with The Devil and the Deep, Men in Masks, and The Clean Wineglass (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1935). Quin then appeared in two novels, The Evil Messenger (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1938) and Fear Walked Behind (London: Robert Hale, 1942). Assisted by Martin Huish, Quin investigates supernatural mysteries as a specialist detective.

1931

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Matson Bell

Matson Bell appeared in Conrad Richter’s two short stories, run in Ghost Stories. The stories are “The Toad-Man Spectre” (10.6 [June, 1931] pp. 66-73) and “Monster of the Dark Places” (11.4 [Dec., 1931/Jan., 1932] pp. 110-16). Both stories are reprinted in Giving Up the Ghosts: Short-Lived Occult Detective Series by Six Renowned Authors (Greenville, OH: Coachwhip Press, 2015), edited by Tim Prasil. Assisted by Harper, a clairvoyant, in the first story and by Richter in the second, Bell investigates supernatural mysteries with criminal roots as a specialist-detective.

An unnamed narrator appeared in Robert E. Howard’s short story “The Black Stone” in Weird Tales (18.4 [Nov., 1931]). It is possible that this unnamed character is John Conrad, a theory that I explain here. The character investigates a supernatural mystery as a specialist detective.

Dr. Muncing appeared in Gordon MacCreagh’s two short stories, published in Strange Tales. They are “Dr. Muncing, Exorcist” (1.1 [Sept., 1931] pp. 68-84) and “The Case of the Sinister Shape” (2.1 [Mar., 1932] pp. 109-24). Munsing investigates supernatural mysteries as a doctor-detective. Preliminary research suggests he has clairvoyant powers.

1932

An unnamed narrator appeared in Robert E. Howard’s short story “The Thing on the Roof” in Weird Tales (19.2 [Feb., 1932). It is possible that this unnamed character is John Conrad, a theory that I explain here. The character investigates a supernatural mystery as a specialist detective.

“Dr. Lowell” appeared in Abraham Merritt’s novel Burn, Witch, Burn!, serialized in six parts in Argosy Weekly (233.4 [Oct. 22, 1932]; 233.5 [Oct. 29, 1932]; 233.6 [Nov. 5, 1932]; 234.1 [Nov. 12, 1932]; 234.2 [Nov. 19, 1932]; and 234.3 [Nov. 26, 1932]). It was then published in book form (New York: Liveright, 1933), and multiple reprints have been published since. Lowell investigates a supernatural mystery as a doctor-detective.

1933

Dr. Edward Carstairs appeared in Agatha Christie’s short story “The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael,” collected in The Hound of Death and Other Stories (London: Odhams, 1933, pp. 164-88). It was reprinted in The Golden Ball and Other Stories (New York: Dodd, Mead, and Co., 1971). Assisted by Dr. Settle, Carstairs investigates a supernatural mystery with criminal roots as a doctor detective. [Note: Both the Odhams and Dodd, Mead, and Co. editions have the odd discrepancy of using “Andrew” in the title but “Arthur” in the story proper. Some later editions have changed “Andrew” to “Arthur” in the title, so I follow that decision here.]

Dr. John Dale appeared in Hugh Davidson’s novel The Master Vampire, serialized in Weird Tales (22.4 [Oct., 1933]; 22.5 [Nov., 1933]; 22.6 [Dec., 1933]; 23.1 [Jan., 1934]). Dale appeared again in “The House of the Evil Eye,” also in Weird Tales (27.6 [June, 1936]). Both stories were collected in The Vampire Master and Other Tales of Terror (Royal Oak, MI: Haffner Press, 2000). Hugh Davidson was a pen name used by Edmond Hamilton. Assisted by Harley Owen, Dale investigates supernatural mysteries. Further research is in progress.

Duke de Richleau appeared in Dennis Wheatley’s series of novels, some of which qualify as occult detection. All eleven novels are The Forbidden Territory (London: Hutchinson, 1933), The Devil Rides Out (London: Hutchinson, 1934), The Golden Spaniard (London: Hutchinson, 1938), Three Inquisitive People (in Three Modern Musketeers, London: Hutchinson, 1940), Strange Conflict (London: Hutchinson, 1941), Codeword – Golden Fleece (London: Hutchinson, 1946), The Second Seal (London: Hutchinson, 1950), The Prisoner in the Mask (London: Hutchinson, 1957), Vendetta in Spain (London: Hutchinson, 1961), Dangerous Inheritance (London: Hutchinson, 1965), and Gateway to Hell (London: Hutchinson, 1970). My preliminary research suggests that The Devil Rides Out, Strange Conflict, and Gateway to Hell are the supernatural novels. Further research is in progress.

 1934

Steve Harrison appeared in Robert E. Howard’s series of short stories published in various magazines. The stories published first are “Fangs of Gold” (Strange Detective Stories, Feb., 1934, a.k.a. “People of the Serpent”); “The Tomb’s Secret” (Strange Detective Stories, Feb., 1934, a.k.a. “Teeth of Doom”); “Names in the Black Book” (Super Detective Stories, Mar., 1934); “Graveyard Rats” (Thrilling Mystery, Feb., 1936). Stories published posthumously are “The Black Moon,” “The Voice of Death,” “The House of Suspicion,” and “The Silver Heel.” All of the stories are collected in Steven Harrison’s Casebook (Plano, TX: Robert E. Howard Foundation Press, 2011). Harrison investigates criminal mysteries with supernatural elements as a specialist-detective.

John Kirowan appeared in Robert E. Howard’s short story “The Haunter of the Ring” (Weird Tales 23.6 [June, 1934]). Though not acting as an occult detective, he had earlier appeared in “The Children of the Night” (Weird Tales 17.3 [Apr./May, 1931]) and later in “Dig Me No Grave” (Weird Tales 29.2 [Feb., 1937]). Some include the story “Dermod’s Bane” (Magazine of Horror #17, Fall 1967) with the series because its narrator is named Kirowan (though quite possibly Michael, not John), but this is yet another work that is not occult detection. Two additional stories include John Kirowan: “The House in the Oaks” in Dark Things (Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1971), a fragment completed by August Derleth, and “Dagon Manor” in Shudder Stories #4 (March 1986), a fragment completed by C.J. Henderson. The first four are collected in The Horror Stories of Robert E. Howard (New York: Del Ray, 2008) while “The House in the Oaks” is included in its original fragment form and “Dagon Manor” is left out completely. In “The Haunter of the Ring,” Kirowan is assisted by John O’Donnel and investigates a supernatural mystery as a specialist-detective.

1935

Ascott Keane appeared in Paul Ernst’s series of novellas about supervillian Dr. Satan printed in Weird Tales. The series includes “Dr. Satan” (26.2 [Aug., 1935]); “The Man Who Chained Lightning” (26.3 [Sept., 1935]); “Hollywood Horror” (26.4 [Oct., 1935); “The Consuming Flame” (26.5 [Nov., 1935]); “Horror Insured” (27.1 [Jan., 1936]); “Beyond Death’s Gateway” (27. 3 [Mar., 1935]); “The Devil’s Double” (27.5 [May, 1936]); and “Mask of Death” (28.2 [Aug., 1936]). The entire collection was published in a single volume titled The Complete Dr. Satan (Boston: Altus Press, 2013). Keane investigates crimes committed by a supernatural criminal as a specialist detective, but I haven’t confirmed this.

1936

Gregory George Gordon Green, a.k.a. Gees, appeared in Jack Mann’s series of novels. They include Gees’ First Case (London: Wright & Brown, 1936); Grey Shapes (London: Wright & Brown, 1937); Nightmare Farm (London: Wright & Brown, 1937); The Kleinert Case (London: Wright & Brown, 1938); Maker of Shadows (London: Wright & Brown, 1938); The Ninth Life (London: Wright & Brown, 1939); Her Ways Are Death (London: Wright & Brown, 1940); and The Glass Too Many (London: Wright & Brown, 1940). Except for The Klienert Case, all the novels were reprinted by Bookfinger in the 1970s and early 1980s. Ramble House has published all eight novels from 2010 to 2012. Jack Mann was the pen name of E. Charles Vivian. Green appears to investigate crimes and supernatural mysteries as a specialist-detective, but I haven’t confirmed this.

Detective-Lieutenant Peters and Commissioner Ethredge appeared in Thorp McClusky’s series of novellas. They include Loot of the Vampire  (Weird Tales 27.6 [June, 1936] and 27.7 [July, 1936]); The Woman in Room 607 (Weird Tales 29.1 [Jan., 1937]); The Thing on the Floor (Weird Tales 31.3 [Mar., 1938]); Monstrosity of Evolution (Amazing Stories 12.6 [Nov., 1938]); and Slaves of the Gray Mold (Weird Tales 35.2 [Mar., 1940]). The four Weird Tales novellas were reprinted in Loot of the Vampire (Oak Lawn, IL: Robert Weinberg, 1975). Peters and Ethredge appear to investigate crimes with supernatural elements as specialist detectives.

1938

Judge Keith Hilary Pursuivant appeared in Gans T. Field’s series of novellas and short stories printed in Weird Tales. The series includes “The Hairy Ones Shall Dance” (31.1 [Jan., 1938], 31.2 [Feb., 1938], 31.3 [Mar., 1938]); “The Black Drama” (31.6 [June, 1938], 32.1 [July, 1938], 32.2 [Aug., 1938]); “The Dreadful Rabbits [35.4 (July-Aug., 1940]); and “The Half-Haunted” [36.1 (Sept.-Oct., 1941) pp. 83-92]. These stories are all reprinted in Fearful Rock and Other Precarious Locales (San Fransisco: Night Shade, 2001). Judge Pursuivant returns as a “supporting” character in later stories about occult detective characters created by the same author: “Chastel” in The Year’s Best Horror Stories VII (New York: DAW, 1979), featuring Lee Cobbett; The Hanging Stones (Garden City: Doubleday, 1982), featuring Silver John; and The School of Darkness (Garden City: Doubleday, 1985), featuring John Thunstone. Gans T. Field was a pen name of Manly Wade Wellman. Pursuivant investigates supernatural mysteries as a specialist-detective.

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